Dark Sky – Kilter (2017)

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Dark Sky return with two highly effective techno tracks featuring dark and roaring basslines at the center, the London duo leave no doubt that they haven’t lost any of their acclaimed production skills. “Kilter” is a rhythm-driven club anthem, featuring a sweeping bassline that nods to classic Dark Sky, while on the Bsdie, “Acacia” opens with ethereal synth pads before giving way to a onslaught of low end goodness before slowly
revealing building percussion which finally climaxes in all its thumping glory. Dark Sky’s first release since Voyages (2015) may in parts seem like quite a functional affair, but it is only a tiny glimpse at what their forthcoming album Othona has in store.

Orbital – Kinetic (2017)

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More than two years since announcing their second split, in October 2014, Orbital have once again settled their differences and announced a reunion – along with a series of festival tour dates and new music.

The British dance duo, brothers Paul and Phil Hartnoll, will break their silence with three outdoor events confirmed so far for this summer. They headline Forbidden Fruit in Dublin, Standon Calling in Hertfordshire and the Bluedot festival at Jodrell Bank radio telescope near Manchester. There’s new music, too, with a new single Kinetic.

Turinn – Frank White (2017)

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Debut release from a new addition to the Modern Love family featuring 10 dancefloor variants shot from the hip. RIYL Kassem Mosse, Willow, Lorenzo Senni, DJ Stingray, Move D, El-B…

Outta the shadows and into the strobe-light, Alex Lewis aka Turinn debuts on Modern Love with a highly rinsable debut double-pack of sawn-off brukbeats and anxious, nerve-riding grooves brewed in the ravines of North Manchester. Turinn emerges from a new generation of producers in the city that include longtime spar Willow, and upcoming producer Croww, soon to offer up his own debut recordings.

Crooked and rugged AF, but tempered by an acute emotive sensitivity, 18 1/2 Minute Gaps renders a bleedin’ cross-section of mongrel, hybrid style ’n pattern in a breathless, deceptively freehand fashion that comes riddled with an electric blue energy all of its own. Committing ten trax of fractious, mutant funk and sore feels, 18 1/2 minute Gaps serves to cap Turinn’s formative phase of production like a lead lid on a nuclear rave implosion; trapping original ‘ardcore ‘nuum, Detroit booty and dank post-punk elements in a perpetual flux of in-the-pocket grooves which ravenously attempt to split at the seams, alternately pushing into Muslimgauze-like buffer zones of distortion or resoundingly wide ambient dimensions, and often both at once.

On the first plate, this ambiguous dichotomy is epitomised between the rare surge of quick/slow torque in Ovum, which almost sounds like Chris Carter sparring with Burial Hex, and then in his nod to the Italian new wave with Elba, which seems to find the square root between Lorenzo Senni and some skudgy as heck Kassem Mosse grind, whereas the bittersweet soul of 1625 finds compatible links with his close peer, Workshop’s Willow as well as Japan’s Shinichi Atobe and scene enabler Move D, while Parratactico swaggers into quantum dancehall meters.

The second disc is no less deadly: the album title track runs at a nexx level Detroit momentum like DJ Stingray flipping Derrick May and Carl Craig’s Kaotic Harmonies, before ESO cuts in like a super cranky El-B wearing itchy Primark underwear, and the bone-rattling hardcore jungle of Spawn soon enough gives way to the sweetlad couplet of Petrichor and Ondine, where his elusive, distressed melodic touch really shines thru

Letherette – Triosys (2017)

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Strictly limited edition black/white-flecked cassette in a yellow library case featuring a 40 minute mix of previously unreleased Letherette productions. “Where Have All The People Gone?” will be available from 25th November 2016 to partner the release of Letherette’s second album for Ninja Tune: “Last Night On The Planet”.

Ricardo Garduno – Unfair Decisions EP (2017)

Born and raised in Mexico, Ricardo Garduno, is no stranger to the global Techno industry.
Ricardo Garduno is the head of the very successful Techno label from Mexico, Illegal Alien Records. He also has numerous successful productions on some of the most reputable Techno labels around the world such as, Warm Up, Nachtstrom Schallplatten, Sleaze Records, Intacto and Machine Box just to name a few.
His music can be described as a perfect blend of organic, deep, hypnotic, melodic, dark, distorted, twisted and whatever sounds good.
The present is great for Ricardo Garduno but the future will definitely be even better.

Lusine – Just A Cloud (2017)

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From his early releases as Lusine onward, Jeff McIlwain’s electronic explorations make up one of the more diverse discographies of the past decade and a half. Effortlessly blurring the lines between techno, electro-pop and experimental composition, the Texas-raised/Seattle-based producer’s arrangements are meticulously constructed, but also filled with emotion and soul. With an introspective turn that’s hinted at in the record title, Lusine’s fourth album for Ghostly sees McIlwain diffusing the pop-leanings of 2013’s The Waiting Room with opaque, brush-stroked melodies washing over these new buoyant productions.

“I suppose the concept behind Sensorimotor pulls from a special kind of double meaning of the word,” McIlwain reveals. “The literal, to me, is the integration of your senses with actions, like with birds and how they move so fluidly in flocks. It’s just fascinating how their brains are able to comprehend such quick actions collectively at once.”

“The symbolic is a bit harder to put into words,” he adds. “I guess it’s just the concept of figuring out how much control you have over your artistic output—what types of restrictions you should place on it versus how much of it just involves instinct and intuitiveness.”

Indeed, Sensorimotor is a visceral album, with gorgeous opener “Canopy” slowly building into an empyrean cloud of music box chimes and an amorphous thrum. The following “Ticking Hands” is just as beguiling yet also more formed, with the processed melancholy vocals of McIlwain and his wife Sarah filtered into a chilling lament that unfolds over the song’s light skitters and Kraftwerkian pulse.

“Sarah and I wrote this song (“Ticking Hands”) as a kind of catharsis for the time we spend apart when I’m touring,” McIlwain explains. “It’s about the idea of being somewhere and wishing your other half was there to experience those moments.”

Sensorimotor finds other past Lusine collaborators returning as well, with longtime friend Benoît Pioulard’s narcotic croon looped into a swirling arpeggio during “Witness.” Vilja Larjosto also makes two appearances, with her sun-kissed vocal melodies spliced and splayed across the steady pulsing bass and fluorescent synth pads of “Just a Cloud,” and later on “Won’t Forget,” delivering a breathy processed melody atop a jaunty shuffle of cut-up woodwind instruments and keys.

Working with an arsenal that includes an MPC1000, a borrowed Prophet 5, hand percussion, glockenspiel, as well as field recordings and samples of live instruments, McIlwain’s productions often merge the digital world with the real world. Yet from the fluttering Terry Riley-esque samples of woodwinds in “Chatter” to the epic, widescreen synths of “The Lift,” Sensorimotor is surprisingly cohesive throughout. Its ebb and flow forms a musical narrative that’s as much a Lusine album as it is a soundtrack for the listener’s own imagination.